Skip to navigation – Site map

Colloque 2009 : Un seul monde, une seule école ? Les modèles scolaires à l'épreuve de la mondialisation

12, 13, 14 mars 2009 - CIEP
One World, One School? School Models and Globalisation

Education systems have been based on several models with a universal aim that have applied to a wide range of countries and situations. This rationale for seeking convergence has always been encouraged by international bodies as well as by the bilateral cooperation agreements signed between the different States.
However, after observing the reality of schools in this ‘‘global village’’, it appears that distinct forms of schools have emerged and are continuing to emerge, which are in fact juxtaposed. They live side by side and form a unit that is quite diversified and complex.
This situation has come about due to the historic, political, economic, religious, social and cultural specificity of each country. Moreover, all school systems do not share the same rationale, do not proclaim the same values, and do not necessarily lean towards the same organisation or even the same purposes.
The International Conference organised by the Revue internationale d’éducation de Sèvres aims at defining and analysing the different elements of this diversity. This event will endeavour to discern the developments, resistance, points of convergence and what may be considered as singular or hybrid in nature.
The Conference provides a framework for research and the practices in various countries over four continents, including systemic or local changes, innovative or emerging developments. The participants will also compare the policies implemented by the States, international organisations, schools, territories and communities. This will lead to a better understanding of today’s educational trends in many countries.

  • ATELIER A : L'ÉCOLE ET SES HÉRITAGES. LES RÉSISTANCES AUX ÉVOLUTIONS

    Workshop A: Education and its legacy. Resistance to change
    Edited by Françoise MARTIN VAN DER HAEGEN

    Many education systems are experiencing waves of reform, which seem to be rolling in just as they are responding to the challenge of large-scale expansion in a difficult economic environment where the relationship between staff and students needs redefining. The role of the nation-state in education seems to be under question everywhere, both in the organisation, regulation and funding of the systems, and in teacher training and defining content and curricula. How can each country integrate this global shift into its heritage, along with the traditional reference points that are distinctive of its culture and with the long established implicit or explicit social contract it has with its schools?

  • ATELIER B : L'ÉVALUATION DE L'ÉCOLE PAR LES STANDARDS INTERNATIONAUX

    Workshop B: Assessing education with international standards
    Edited by Jean-Marie DE KETELE

    In recent years, quality standards organisations have emerged in every field of human activity. Educational systems have not escaped this movement and experience tension between those who advocate universal standards and those who defend standards adapted to local contexts. This tension appears on many levels. How is standardisation defined and what implications does it carry? Who is qualified to identify and define standards? How is information gathered? How are results published and used, and for what ends?

  • ATELIER C : LES INEGALITÉS DANS L'ÉDUCATION : RÉPONSES LOCALES, RÉPONSES GLOBALES

    Workshop C: Inequality in education: local responses, global responses
    Edited by Pierre-Louis GAUTHIER

    In the twenty-first century, all societies, from the most developed to the least privileged, have experienced increasing imbalance in their social structures. Everywhere, the social divide is widening into an educational divide that creates inequality. Has equality in education become no more than wishful thinking? Will education be forced to surrender its liberating mission and accept inequality as an inevitable ill? Questions will be asked about the nature of educational inequality, its causes and the potential cures.

  • ATELIER D : VALEURS ET CONTENUS D'ENSEIGNEMENT

    Workshop D: The values and content of teaching
    Edited by Roger-François GAUTHIER and Florence ROBINE

    Whilst quantitative questions regarding the large-scale expansion of education systems were for a long time in the foreground, the issue of content is now a strategic question, because it relates to the effectiveness and quality of learning. But what happens when there is tension between different views of priorities, such as consistency of content between different educational levels, globalisation or better adaptation to students’ actual circumstances and lifestyles?

  • ATELIER E : L'ÉDUCATION, SEGMENT DU MARCHÉ SCOLAIRE ?

    Workshop E: State schooling: an education market sector?
    Edited by Bernard CORNU

    The education market is growing and, alongside schools new players are appearing in education, new forms of school, new learning services, new educational professions. Are schools now merely a segment of the education market? How do the education market and state education interact? Where and how can learning happen? These are questions about the role of schools in the public provision of education. The issue of the education market is also a political issue.

  • ATELIER F : DIVERSITÉ DES ÉLÈVES, DES ENSEIGNANTS ET DIVERSIFICATION DES PRATIQUES

    Workshop F: Student and teacher diversity and the diversification of methods
    Edited by Alain WARZÉE

    Can student diversity, which is not always perceived in a positive light, be a source of richness for teaching and constitute added value in education? There are many “differences” between students on various levels, and it is by diversifying methods and practices that appropriate solutions can be offered. How should students with a disability be catered for? What specific practices should be put into place for receiving and teaching students from minority backgrounds? How should the academic and educational difficulties students from immigrant backgrounds, who are often culturally and socially marginalised, be dealt with? Which methods should be encouraged to respond positively to student diversity: institutional answers (specialised structures) or differentiated teaching methods?